Response to the Violence at Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh

October 27, 2018

Members and Friends of First United Methodist, San Diego,

We learned on national news of the terrible assault on members of the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  Immediately our thoughts turned to friends in the Jewish communities here in San Diego.  I want us, as members of First United Methodist, to speak with a loud and clear voice against any such anti-Semitic acts of terror.  In this time, we will stand with these our neighbors. 

I ask you to join me in prayer.  We will have special prayers in our services tomorrow and we will continue to raise a voice against such crimes in the days ahead. For nearly forty years our congregation has joined in an annual Thanksgiving worship with friends at Beth Israel of San Diego.  Just this past week members of our staff met with Rabbis Michael Berk and Arlene Bernstein to plan for our service together on November 21st at Temple Beth Israel.  Dr. Fanestil will be preaching at the service this year.  Let’s show our solidarity with our neighbors by joining in this service.

First United Methodist Church will stand against such intolerance and violence.  It is evidenced so frequently in our nation and world today.  I want us to be such a voice for any group targeted for abuse or discrimination in our city.  Especially now, however, we stand with these friends at Beth Israel and Jewish communities around the globe.

The peace of Christ,

Philip Amerson

Let Caravans of Hope Be Our Response

Caravans of Hope — Our Response

“CARAVAN” it is a word being used to stir up fear among the good people of the United States.  You can hear it daily — the underlying message is “Be afraid. Be very afraid.” Those of us who follow Jesus need to respond. We need not accept the false dichotomy being offered. 

There are humane and Christian alternatives we can choose.  It is not the either/or of “barbarians at our gates” versus “wide open borders.”  As a nation we can respond with safe and honest practices of processing those who seek and deserve asylum and those who don’t.  There are many constructive ways to offer hospitality and security at the same time.

Those of us who claim to march with the Prince of Peace, who came to earth surrounded by the message “Fear Not,” must respond.  How?

4ACAAA1700000578-5574353-Mexico_says_it_will_break_up_a_caravan_of_migrants_headed_toward-a-70_1522783521361

One possible response is to form our own Caravans.  Let’s make them “Caravans of the Spirit,” “Caravans of Hope and Love,” “Caravans of Compassion.”  Might we join together and march in another direction?  All of us can actually move toward the borders of our nation or at least to the borders of our daily routines to welcome, to send a message that we stand with those who suffer from FEAR — all of them — those brothers and sisters looking for asylum from terror in their home countries, AND those in the United States who are being misled by the deceits of some who seek to divide us and leave many to dwell in a muddle of fear.

Might we substitute HOPE for the HATE that is being encouraged?  Will you join in making today a day when you participate in Caravans of Hope?  From Eastern and Southern Europe, across the British Commonwealth and along the borders of the United States, in our hometowns, in our shopping malls and public spaces — 

DSCF2547

real people are facing the tragic reality of being demonized by those who seem to have no ethical or Biblical moorings. 

Let’s recommit to forming and joining our own caravans — ones that welcome and offer Biblical hospitality to the stranger and sojourner.  The time for a new direction can begin today through simple acts of including others with a smile, a kind word, a gift to those who work with refugees and a VOTE in the coming elections.   These acts indicate we are part of the LARGEST CARAVAN EVER — a Caravan of Hope.

 

 

 

Strong Leaders Serve

Strong Leaders Serve

8661153044_41a654cfbe_zWeek by week we gather at First United Methodist Church in San Diego.  I learn more about this good congregation and the ministries they provide.  The photo shown here is of the church shortly after it moved to the Mission Valley area over 50 years ago.  At the time it moved to a place of dairy farms and orchards. 

Today, it can truly be said this is a place that reflects the old hymn “Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life.”

This past Sunday we spoke of the importance of leaders who serve — HANDS OF THE STRONG.  Little did I know when I chose this topic back in June that it would also be a week of indictments, guilty pleas, new disclosures of the abuses of Catholic clergy or the tragic misguided leadership at Willow Creek Church, the well-known and influential mega church in Illinois.  Nor, did I know that this would be the weekend we would grieve the passing of Senator John McCain.  In the sermon preached on 8/26 we spoke of leadership and remembered the remarkable life of integrity and humility lived by Senator McCain.  It can be read here: HandsofStrong BLOG 8-26-18.

IMG_0860
Elaine beside “The 8” Freeway and the Church Beyond. Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life

So, what of the future?  The photo to the right was taken last week.  It is image of the church taken from a department store parking lot across the busy I-8 freeway.  Elaine, my spouse, is pictured here.  As I consider our future and the leadership that will be required, my prayers go out to the people who will continue the great ministries of this congregation long into the future.  As the United Methodist denomination seems to have lost its way — and is caught up internal controversy — in what Bishop Ken Carder has rightly described as “tacky” (with attribution to Will Campbell).  It is places like San Diego FUMC — and hundreds of churhes across the nation —  in the middle of the busyness all around that offer hope.  Here the vision of a world beyond the corrupt present will endure.  In such places.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forever Abiding

FUMCSD-01.jpgForever Abiding

My God my bright abyss                                  Into which all my longing will not go        Once more I come to the edge of all I know And believing nothing believe in this.    Christian Wiman

Abiding.  In a new place, with new people.  New friends.  Our second Sunday at San Diego First United Methodist Church. 

Attached is the sermon entitled “Forever Abiding” preached on August 19, 2018.

Prayers are appreciated for this fine congregation.  Forward we go.

Shalom,    Philip Amerson

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sermon — Forever Abiding 8-19-18 BLOG

 

 

Splitting the Church is Just “Tacky”

Thankfully, Bishop Ken Carder continues his witness. Truth and Love cannot be separated. The church he describes is the one that nurtured me as well. For those who think a narrowing of our community will bring growth, I would simply ask them to consider, that it was the “Big Tent” Church following WWII that grew the most rapidly in recent years. Yes, we were riding a cultural wave — even as some “traditionalists” are riding theirs today. Whatever, even if severed away, split into, these who might place themselves on the other side will still be my brothers and sisters in Christ. No General Conference action can change this.

Shifting Margins

© Ivan Grlic, Dreamstime

Thoughts of splitting The United Methodist Church trouble me for a host of reasons Some theological and missional.

This polarized and violent world desperately needs the witness of a community that grapples with disputes and differences with humility, mutual respect, and compassion. While divisions have been part of our heritage since the beginning, they never bode well for our commitment to oneness in Christ Jesus.

We need one another, whatever our labels. God has already reconciled us! We have been made one, whether we like it or not. So, I don’t quite understand why we can’t live the reconciliation already accomplished in Christ. If Christ has made us one, should we not live that oneness?

But I’m also troubled for personal reasons.

I’ll always remember that fateful Sunday morning almost 65 years ago when this son of Appalachian tenant farmers and textile workers walked shyly into…

View original post 671 more words

Forever Beginning

67.jpgForever Beginning

From T.S. Eliot’s poem Little Gidding:

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.

Exploring, this time, lands me in the pulpit at First United Methodist Church in San Diego as Interim Pastor.  I have preached in this great church in the past; however, this time is different.  This time, I will have a weekly assignment.  To show up, listen, learn, study and then seek to share truths about the transforming love of God.

This is not an easy task in any season.  Yet, as I face the task now, it seems more challenging than any time in my 52 years of ministry.  Attached is the sermon entitled “Simply Beginning” preached on August 12, 2018. 

Prayers are appreciated for this fine congregation — and for the “weak reed” who will be giving his best in the year ahead.

Shalom,

Philip Amerson

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Sermon — Forever Beginning 8-12-18 PRINT

 

 

Top Ten “Hoosier” Things I Will Miss

Top Ten “Hoosier” Things I Will Miss

We are off to San Diego in August.  Interim lead pastor at San Diego First United Methodist Church, I am nervous and excited.  Well-meaning friends upon hearing these plans say, “Oh, lucky you, it is such a beautiful city with great weather, you are really going to enjoy it.  You will probably get out there and not miss us at all.  You’ll not want to return.”

Well, at this age and stage in life, I know that although my friends mean well, they are both right, AND they are wrong.  Yes, we plan to enjoy San Diego to the full, make new friends, discover great culinary and cultural experiences and share ministry with the good folks.  As much as we are looking forward to this odyssey, we also know that there will be things we will miss.  I have made a list the top ten things I suspect I will miss:

IMG_0167

 

1. Indiana grown, Non-GMO sweet corn, fresh from the field, available at our GRAND farmer’s market each week.  Yes, I know they have fresh sweet corn in California.  I have lived there, twice, and loved it.  However, nothing brings back my childhood like field fresh corn (along with watermelon).  And, for Elaine, she will miss fresh from the garden Indiana heirloom tomatoes.  Each one of these is “summer candy” and a rare delicacy on hot, humid Indiana days.

 

 

IMG_4493
Winston and Sue Shindell at Christmas 2017

2. We will miss friends made and nurtured over the decades who are a lot wacky and all the more to be loved.  Do they know how to party!  There are dozens of them — we have stood by them in times of joy and sorrow — and they have stood by us.  It is a dangerous thing to start listing Indiana friends — so, I won’t.  It is sufficient to say that Elaine and I would be lost without their laughter, wisdom, patience with my mistakes and willingness to forgive.  And they know too many secrets to allow them to think we wouldn’t return!

 

IMG_4332
Friends at the Amerson’s 4th Annual Trifling Picnic, August 2017

 

IMG_0161.jpg
Maria Gonzalez, Bory Colin, Ruben and Isaiah, June 30, 201

Each year we host our annual “Trifling Picnic.”  About 75 to 100 friends normally show up.  Yes, we will host the picnic again this year, just before we head to California.  What is a “Trifling Picnic?  Well, John Wesley counseled that pastors should not be triflingly employed. We offer an opportunity for folks, clergy and lay, Methodist or not to break this rule.

3. We will miss new friends like Maria Gonzelez, Bory Colin, Joshua and Isaiah.  This was the dedication of their new home on June 30th. Monroe County Habitat for Humanity will build and dedicate its 200th home later this summer.  We will miss that and I will miss the wonderful friends I have on the staff and board of this affiliate!

IMG_4376

4.  I will miss colleagues in Ministry.  Pictured here are Revs. Metheny, Mather, Moman and Beck.  We are friends who worked together at Broadway UMC,Indianapolis in the 1980s.  What a team!  What memories!  These colleagues inspire, challenge and allow me to grumble much about the church, particularly our denomination.  They know that I refer to the Indiana Annual Conference as the “Northern Dixie Conference” (with apologies to my southern friends).  Yes, I will miss grumbling about the foolishness of the latest church development techniques while our congregations are hungry for relationships and respect for the gifts they bring.

433d0368-cb8f-4e2f-8b5d-766cf149c01d.jpg

 

5) We will miss the GREAT MUSIC!  In Bloomington, much of it free or very reasonable in cost.  There are literally hundreds of concerts each year at the Jacobs School of Music at I.U.  We recently heard the Student Pops Symphony Orchestra.  It was FIRST RATE.  Over the holiday week there will be a free concert in the park by our friend and marvelous musician Carrie Newcomer.  Then, next week it is violinist Joshua Bell who is in concert on campus.  This fall will be the Lotus music festival we will miss.  And if you are lucky, our friend ,the incomparable, Sylvia McNair will be featured in a fundraiser for a local charity.  Wow… I will miss all of this — and I haven’t mentioned the live theater or the restaurants or performances at the auditorium all in walking distance from our condo!

IMG_4390 2.jpg

 

6) We will miss cheering for the World Champion Chicago Cubs.  (Hey, I know that was back in 2016 but we waited a century for this win and should be granted a few years to claim to be champions out of respect for the suffering of Cubs fans over the years.)  The Cubbies are looking good in 2018.  We will miss what should be an exciting pennant race at Wrigley Field.  Elaine and our daughter Lydia Murray in picture — the Cubs won that day!

 

IMG_4774
Revs. Mary Beth Morgan and Jimmy Moore, Ash Wednesday, 2017.

 

7)  We will miss our fine pastors, Mary Beth Morgan and Jimmy Moore at St. Marks UMC in Bloomington.  We will miss all of our friends in the congregation as well.  What a great congregation and place filled with fond memories.

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment-1.gif
Judge Sarah Evans Barker, photo from the Indianapolis Monthly

8)  I will miss GREAT HUMAN BEINGS in so many categories: carpenters, plumbers, farmers, janitors, teachers, physicians, service folks, lawyers, barkeeps, administrators, and a few rogue preachers.  I will especially miss our great civic and judicial leaders.  Federal Judge Sarah Evans Barker is among the BEST.  We have many other such fine civic leaders — Mayor John Hamilton and his uncle, retired Congressman Lee Hamilton. 

Indiana also has folks I consider to be less than worthy of admiration (no names please).  However, I will miss working for the election of some good folks to replace them.  We have persons running for election this fall more committed to creating the beloved community than practicing the fear laced demagoguery evident in our national body politic these days.  Some of the demagogues are, sad for me to say, “fellow Hoosiers.”  Hopefully we can offer them a free ticket home from Washington this fall.  Yes, we are keeping our residence in Indiana as our votes are needed here.

IMG_4665.jpg

 

9)  I will miss places like New Harmony a wonderful retreat, place for long walks and great educational experiences.  There are many such places in the state…. Indiana University in Bloomington is one I count as among the best.

 

 

 

AND # 10 on the list?

IMG_4794.jpg

Okay, I confess, I am going to miss snow — not the slushy grey-February-type snow.  I will miss the bright snowy days of fall and spring when our streets and fields are festooned with new garments of white.  Such snow is often gone by afternoon or the next day and that is alright with me.  In the meantime — I will enjoy the sunshine of San Diego!